Sunday, 22 April 2018

Chrome OS in a tablet form factor

Acer released the first Chrome OS tablet: the Acer Chromebook Tab 10. The tablet is directed at education and supports a Wacom pen. I like the idea of a Chrome OS tablet and can realistically envisage it to be a laptop replacement (of course, many users may prefer a larger display). In contrast to the iPad Pro series, Chrome OS runs a desktop PC environment that also supports mobile applications via the Google Play store.

The problem with the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 is the high-end specifications that means a relatively high price for a device targeted at education. If these tablets are to be adopted in schools then it is important that vendors make the right compromise between pricing and specifications. For example, a good camera, long battery life and stylus support are necessary but a resolution beyond full HD is not. This is the first Chrome OS tablet and more affordable ones are a strong possibility.

Apple's recently released iPad with Pencil support is another attempt at gaining access in education. Apple aims to take on Chromebooks that are now gradually dominating the sector. Apple's size means that it will always have a place in education; however, what makes the Chromebook model a better fit is the simplicity of deployment and affordable hardware. The latest iPad may be priced lower relative to other iPad models but the pricing, after introducing the Apple Pencil and external keyboard, makes it a costly option even when compared to the high-end Acer Chromebook Tab 10.

Thursday, 5 April 2018

Amazon adds extra features to online content management

I have noticed that Amazon supports online management of collections. It is possible to create a new collection and add/remove Kindle e-books and personal documents from an existing collection. In addition, if you have a large library, the restriction on selecting a maximum of ten documents at a time has now been removed. I still think Tolino’s online content management interface is more intuitive and easier to use. Tolino's web reader is integrated into online content management and it is possible to view/change e-book covers.

Update: I forgot to note that Tolino's online content management allows the uploading of documents from a local hard drive. As far as I can tell, Amazon doesn't support the feature. The only way to send documents wirelessly to a Kindle e-reader is via either the Send to Kindle application or email.