Showing posts with label Kindle. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kindle. Show all posts

Thursday, 21 March 2019

The Kindle Basic gets an update

Amazon updated its entry-level Kindle. The biggest hardware upgrade is the introduction of a front light. With the hardware improvement, like the Kindle Paperwhite, there is a £10 increase (the price is £69.99 but expect the device to be regularly put on sale, e.g. on Prime Day and Black Friday). The updated Kindle Basic is slightly heavier than the previous generation – the previous generation weighed 161 Grams and the current one weighs 174 Grams – but I prefer the new design with its rounded corners.

The front light is a welcome addition, but it is the pixel density that should’ve been upgraded (the new Kindle Basic keeps the 167 PPI of the previous generation). An upgrade to 221 PPI would’ve made a big difference to the reading experience. In terms of trade-off, the pixel density is more important than a front light. On a positive note, Amazon did upgrade the screen technology to E-Ink Carta. If you don’t care for the front light and E-Ink Carta, Amazon now sells the previous generation for £49.99.

Overall, this is a predictable Amazon refresh with small upgrades. Amazon no longer seeks to innovate with its tablets and e-readers. Alexa powered devices are the focus and future of Amazon hardware.

Friday, 7 December 2018

Reflections on the Kindle Paperwhite 4

Considering the slow development of e-reader technology there is nothing innovative with the Kindle Paperwhite 4. The latest iteration, mostly, matches the hardware features of other vendors. You still do not get the nightlight feature, but you do get water-proofing (not all vendors support water-proofing at a similar price). Despite the hardware stagnation, the Kindle Paperwhite remains the best six-inch e-reader. The reason, as I posted before, for the Paperwhite’s superiority is Amazon’s polished software. As an e-reader is a single purpose device then the software is the biggest factor when choosing the right one. Below are further reflections on the Kindle Paperwhite 4:
  • Amazon’s excellent software and hardware integration mean the Kindle is optimised for its purpose bottom-up. The Paperwhite 4's battery life is better than the Kindle Oasis 2 and is what you expect from an E-Ink device. This bottom-up optimisation is absent with Android e-readers and this affects not only battery life but also general user-experience.
  •  I would avoid the over-priced Kindle Oasis 2. The extra inch makes a difference but is still not large enough for PDF reading. For e-books, the extra inch is better for text immersion but is not essential and not worth the Oasis’s price differential. I like the simplicity and features of the Kindle’s PDF software but an Android e-reader, e.g. one of Onyx’s devices, is better and with more options and features for PDF reading. The coupling of Android with extra screen size also makes Android e-readers, to an extent, multi-purpose devices. 
  • The Kindle Paperwhite’s flush display is a fingerprint magnet. I own the Kobo Aura One, but it doesn’t have this issue. The fingerprint issue is a negative but not a big problem. 
  • In my view, the Kobo Aura One, in comparison to the Kindle Paperwhite 4, has better contrast. The Kindle Paperwhite 4 contrast is acceptable and better than the Kindle Oasis 2. Contrast adjustment, something Boyue and Onyx e-readers support, is an important feature that Amazon's e-readers need to adopt. Kindle e-readers, currently, only support text bolding. 
  • Water-proofing, Bluetooth support, expanded storage and an improved front light are all improvements that make the Kindle Paperwhite 4 a better option than the Kindle Oasis 2. As said, the extra inch is now the Oasis 2’s stand-out hardware feature and I don’t think the extra size is worth an extra £110.

Thursday, 18 October 2018

The Kindle Paperwhite is finally updated

I thought Amazon wasn't going to update any Kindle in 2018 but I got it wrong. Amazon, with little fuss, updated the Kindle Paperwhite. The Kindle Paperwhite 4 is a typical Kindle update, i.e. incremental with just enough to justify an overdue refresh.

The Kindle Paperwhite keeps the six-inch display (something expected considering the 'premium' Kindle Oasis 2 has a seven-inch display). Storage goes up to 8 GB or 32 GB for the extra space required due to Audible support. There is also water-proofing, Bluetooth support, an extra LED for the front light and the weight is decreased to 182 grams.

The Paperwhite 4 is also more robust than the previous generation and is designed to withstand small drops. There is no indication that the Paperwhite 4 is using E-Ink Mobius, so it is not clear what Amazon did to make the screen more robust. Due to the extra features and storage, Amazon has increased the pricing from £109.99 to £119.99.

Saturday, 6 October 2018

What processor is the Kobo Forma using?

Kobo, on their official page, isn't very clear about the processor that runs on the Kobo Forma. You need to visit their media library webpage to find out that the Forma's processor is the same one that runs on the older Aura ONE, i.e. the single-core NXP i.MX6. The Kindle Oasis uses a more capable 1GHZ dual-core i.MX7D processor. The difference between the single-core i.MX6 and dual-core i.MX7 is noticeable - the Oasis is zippier than the Kobo Aura ONE. It is odd that Kobo decided to stick with the same processor considering the Forma is meant to be their now premium e-reader. Maybe the selection of the same processor was a trade-off due to the Forma's E-Ink's Mobius screen technology.

Wednesday, 5 September 2018

Further reflections on the Kindle Oasis

My review of the Kindle Oasis was positive. There is a lot to like about the Oasis but there are certain things that now bother me about the device after prolonged use. Below are the main issues:
  • Battery life is poor for an e-reader. The Kindle Oasis 2 has a 1000 mAh battery capacity and I found the device drains completely after two days of continuous use. To compare, the Kobo Aura One has a 1200mAh capacity and after Kobo’s recent firmware updates lasts longer than the Oasis 2. The Kindle Oasis re-charges fast so that somewhat makes up for the poor battery life. 
  • The text is sharp, but the contrast isn’t good. Text appears dark grey rather than inky black. I even found the Kindle Basis has darker text (see comparison picture below). Due to the sub-standard contrast, I tend to bold text to make it appear darker. To be fair, E-Ink has never reached the deep black you get on a Super Amoled screen. CLEARInk promises to deliver superior blacks but we haven’t yet seen a consumer e-reader with the technology. 
  • I don’t like the form factor. Amazon claims the uneven design makes it easier to hold. The original Amazon case was designed to make it easy to remove the Oasis 2 and read one-handed. This was a device designed to be used without a case. There is a problem: when reading the device without a case the metallic back is cold to the hand. The thin edges also make the e-reader feel fragile. It would’ve been a better idea if Amazon released an anti-knock bumper case for the Oasis 2 instead of the now-withdrawn official case that doesn’t completely cover the device. The Kobo Aura One’s all-plastic design might be utilitarian, but it works. Plus, the Aura One’s design makes finding a good case easier. I use a Belkin iPad Mini case that fits the device perfectly. 
In my view, the contrast issue is the biggest problem. An e-reader does one thing and should do it well – the faded text is a drawback in that regard. The Oasis is a good e-reader, but it does not offer anything exceptional beyond the extra screen size to justify its price. Considering screen size, the Kobo Aura One is larger and cheaper.

Text darkness comparison: Kindle Oasis Vs. Kindle Basic (click to enlarge)

Tuesday, 31 July 2018

Kinde Basic vs Tolino Page: which is best?

I am a fan of the budget e-reader. They are good value devices and, despite the low resolution, are far better for reading than the highest resolution tablet screen. Kobo released the Kobo Touch 2.0 (late 2015) as a budget e-reader, with a 167 PPI E-Ink Pearl screen, but dropped the device later. Another choice is the Tolino Page but Tolino’s e-readers are restricted to a few countries. Nevertheless, it is possible to import the Tolino Page from an online retailer based in Germany. In this post, I will compare the Tolino Page (a device I previously reviewed here) with the Kindle Basic. Below are my impressions on both devices and why I prefer the Kindle Basic:
  • Online content management, in comparison to Amazon, is one area that Tolino is superior. Register for the Tolino Cloud and you can then read online in the browser, organise collections and upload books. The user interface is intuitive, and it is possible to view and change book covers. Amazon does allow online content management, but it is like a file browser in which the user can delete documents, add documents to collections and download documents. The Kindle Cloud Reader is not integrated into content management and needs access through an external website. The Kindle Cloud Reader also only allows access to documents bought from the Kindle Store.
  • The Kindle Basic's software is superior to the Tolino Page. I have posted about Amazon’s software before, so this is a quick summary. Amazon offers a uniform software experience on all the current batch of e-readers (also, the earlier generation of the Kindle Basic, Kindle Paperwhite and Kindle Oasis all run the latest firmware). In Amazon’s firmware it is possible, for example, to bold text, look-up Wikipedia, translate words, utilise a vocabulary builder of dictionary look-ups and export notes in a notebook format. PDF support, in Amazon's firmware, is refined - it is possible to double tap to zoom, highlight/annotate, increase text contrast, decrease margins, and change orientation. In other words, it is a fully functional PDF reader. Tolino does support basic e-reading functionality but without many of the advanced features, you get with the Kindle Basic. Tolino Page's PDF functionality, like Kobo, is restricted to supporting a basic viewer and with no way to interact with the text.
  • The Kindle Basic is zippier in comparison to the Tolino Page. The Tolino Page's performance is adequate, but you notice the difference when you put the two devices side by side. Both devices have the same resolution and despite the Tolino Page's E-Ink Carta screen, the text is darker on the Kindle Basic (see picture below for a comparison between the Kindle Basic and Tolino Page). This may seem odd, though less sharp, and blocky, I found the text on the Kindle Basic darker than the high-end Kindle Oasis (I will dedicate a post with further reflections on the Kindle Oasis. My review was positive but after prolonged use, there are some issues I will flag). 
Text contrast comparison between the Kindle Basic and Tolino Page (click on image to enlarge)
  • Another plus is the relative lightweight of the Kindle Basic. The device weighs 161 grams. The Tolino Page is light too at 170 grams. The Kindle Paperwhite is significantly heavier than both devices at 205 grams. The lightweight makes the Kindle Basic a good companion when travelling or commuting.      
Overall, the Kindle Basic is hands-down the best entry-level e-reader from an established vendor. The device makes a great gift, an e-reader for children or something light to carry when travelling. Yet a qualification needs mentioning: there is hardly any choice, now, in the basic e-reader category. It is also not clear if the Kindle Basic will be phased out. With the Voyage gradually being dropped it is possible an updated Paperwhite will come at a lower price and this means the Kindle Basic might no longer be a choice. Of course, this is speculation.

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Firmware 5.9.6 & Arabic e-books

I stated in the previous post that I will provide an overview of firmware 5.9.6's support for Arabic e-books. Below are my impressions after testing the feature:
  1. E-books purchased from Amazon worked well. I sent two sample e-books from the Kindle store and the text aligned right to left. By default, two fonts were supported and even side-loaded fonts worked too. It is also possible to look-up definitions and use an Arabic keyboard to write annotations. Font bolding, however, is not supported in Arabic e-books. 
  2. I wirelessly sent two MOBI e-books and had significant problems. The major issue was the time it took to open an e-book - in both documents tested the Kindle completely froze. Further, even basic functions, e.g. turning pages, stalled the device. I further tested a side-loaded e-book and had the same issues. 
I am not sure if this is a problem with the Kindle firmware, as I didn’t have these issues when I opened the same e-books using an Amazon Fire tablet. I think there is something wrong with firmware 5.9.6 and Amazon could be working on a further update to resolve these problems.

Friday, 8 June 2018

Amazon's Kindle e-readers now support side loaded fonts

Amazon released a firmware update for their Kindle e-readers (5.9.6). The highlight of the update is the support for side-loaded fonts. Unfortunately, similar to the bolding feature, side-loaded fonts do not work in MOBI e-books. I found that converting an e-book, in Calibre, to both new and old formats of MOBI sometimes resolves this problem. The other option is to convert the e-book to an AZW3 e-book but this works only through directly side loading the document via USB, as Amazon doesn’t allow users to send AZW3 e-books wirelessly to their Kindle device. A major issue with side loading an e-book is that it will not be archived online in personal documents and synced across devices.

Another new feature with the firmware update is support for Arabic e-books. I’ll the test the feature and provide an overview in a further post.

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

Is Amazon phasing-out the entry-level Kindle?

It appears Amazon removed the entry-level Kindle from their main Kindle listing page. Of course, this is speculation, but it seems Amazon is re-working their e-reader line-up. I expect the entry-level Kindle to be phased-out; instead, the line-up will be restricted to the Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle Voyage, and Kindle Oasis. With the Kindle Paperwhite being the new entry-level e-reader, I also expect an updated Paperwhite model priced below $100. If the speculation is correct then I also expect the Kindle Voyage to be updated too. An 800 X 600 E-Ink Pearl screen entry-level e-reader is now out-dated, and no major vendor offers the technology (even the low-resolution Tolino Page has an E-Ink Carta display).

Thursday, 31 May 2018

An incoming Kindle Paperwhite update?

A link for a new model of the Paperwhite was spotted. The link leads to a test product page with an image of the previous generation Kindle Basic. Amazon often intentionally leaks information, gradually, of a new device before its release. In addition, Amazon usually releases devices late Spring/early summer or late autumn. Considering the timing, a new Paperwhite should be appearing soon. The updated device might keep the six-inch form factor but add waterproofing and Audible support. We might also see a re-design of the Paperwhite (the Paperwhite hasn’t significantly changed since its first release late 2012).

Thursday, 5 April 2018

Amazon adds extra features to online content management

I have noticed that Amazon supports online management of collections. It is possible to create a new collection and add/remove Kindle e-books and personal documents from an existing collection. In addition, if you have a large library, the restriction on selecting a maximum of ten documents at a time has now been removed. I still think Tolino’s online content management interface is more intuitive and easier to use. Tolino's web reader is integrated into online content management and it is possible to view/change e-book covers.

Update: I forgot to note that Tolino's online content management allows the uploading of documents from a local hard drive. As far as I can tell, Amazon doesn't support the feature. The only way to send documents wirelessly to a Kindle e-reader is via either the Send to Kindle application or email.

Wednesday, 28 February 2018

Supporting the font bolding feature in a MOBI e-book

Amazon does not allow users to send AZW3 e-books to a Kindle device via WiFi. However, I noticed that it is possible to send a MOBI e-book to a Kindle e-reader and still make use of the font bolding feature.

The solution is to use Calibre to convert an e-book to MOBI in both old and new formats. In Calibre, under MOBI file type output, select ‘both’ as the MOBI file type. After conversion, it is possible to send the e-book to a Kindle device via email or Send to Kindle.

Tuesday, 6 February 2018

Kindle firmware update (5.9.4)

Amazon just released a firmware update for their Kindle devices (5.9.4) - the update is for 6th generation devices and up. Unfortunately, the update doesn't include font bolding for MOBI e-books. According to Amazon, the updates are minor and include:
Expanded Search: In-book search now includes results from your notes and highlights.
Clock: Now you can check the current time without leaving the page you're reading. Use the option in Display Settings (Aa) menu to display the clock. 
Usually it can take up to a few weeks for the update to download via WiFi. However, it is possible to download and install the update manually (instructions available here).

Saturday, 9 December 2017

Kindle Oasis Review: The Oasis sets the new benchmark for an e-reader

Without doubt, the latest iteration of Kindle Oasis is the best e-reader from Amazon. Yet, this is expected considering the pricing and premium tag. The question is if the device offers that much extra to justify the price differential in comparison to other e-readers. Overall, while Amazon should have done more to distinguish the Oasis, the device sets the benchmark for a feature rich and immersive e-reading experience.

An a-symmetric design that doesn’t work 

I am not a fan of the device’s design. The metallic back, without a case, is cold to the hand and the device’s lopsided design makes it uneven to hold. Amazon designed their official case to attach magnetically to the thicker end to provide a flat reading surface. Unfortunately, this leaves part of the metallic back exposed when the case is closed (Amazon withdrew the official case due to design flaws).

The buttons are a real plus. They are located at the thicker end and make page turning so much easier with one-handed reading. The buttons can be used left and right-handed, as the Oasis supports automatic rotation.

Extra-size makes a difference

The extra inch makes a significant difference. The device is seven inch across and this means a thirty percent increase in reading screen estate. There is also extra width; the device’s width is closer to the Aura One than the Paperwhite. I find the extra space helps with text immersion and the extra width makes PDF text more legible in landscape mode.

Nice screen but nothing special

If you are coming from the Kindle Paperwhite then you will notice little difference in screen quality (both devices come with an E-Ink Carta screen and 300 DPI). I found the Oasis’s contrast slightly lacking but the text sharp.

The adaptive front-light has twelve LEDs that produce uniform lighting with little shadowing. The front-light is the best I’ve seen on an e-reader and significantly better than the Kobo Aura One. The Kindle Oasis, unlike the Aura One, does not support front-light colour shifting for night-time reading.

Kobo Aura One vs. Kindle Oasis front-light comparison 

Solid and stable software

As stated in a review of the Kindle Basic, Amazon’s Kindle software is feature rich and stable (I have provided an overview of the Kindle’s operating system in the Kindle Basic review. Also, I have previously posted on the Kindle’s good PDF support here). Amazon runs the near same software on all its e-readers. Software differences that do exist cater for device specific hardware features e.g. Bluetooth support and adaptive display lighting.

One software issue that continues to frustrate is the limited control over text display. Font size options are set in absolute size and the difference between, for example, size two and three is too disproportionate (the issue is accentuated with a relatively high 300 DPI screen). A possible solution, to get something between size three and four, is to increase font-weight to two. Unfortunately, this option only works with AZW3 e-books. Hopefully, in the future, there will be a software update that extends font weight options to MOBI e-books.

The Oasis comes with in-built Bluetooth support and Audible integration. I would recommend going for the 32GB Oasis if Audio books are something important (audio books take a lot of storage). Personally, I find something like a smart-phone, laptop or tablet better suited for audio books.

Battery life & waterproofing

This is Amazon’s first e-reader with waterproofing. I haven’t tested the feature but Amazon advertise the device with an IPX8 rating that can withstand immersion in up to 2 metres of fresh water for one hour.

I expected better battery-life, considering the pricing. Based on personal estimation, I found the Oasis’s battery life to be behind the Paperwhite but still last longer than the Aura One. This is not surprising as the Paperwhite has a larger battery capacity (the Paperwhite has a 1320 mAh battery capacity. In comparion, the Kindle Oasis 2 has a 1000 mAh battery capacity). Of course, battery life depends on, for example, front-light intensity, indexing and WiFi.

Too expensive for an e-reader?

Is the Oasis too expensive for an e-reader? Many technology websites answer in the affirmative. I think the device is dedicated to the e-reading community and for this segment of users, the Oasis might be worth-it.

The better question to ask, directed at dedicated e-readers, is if the Oasis is worth-it considering the existence of, for example, the cheaper Kobo H20 and Aura One? In my view, if it is merely a question of hardware then the Aura One would be the better choice. Even so, Amazon’s superior and polished software experience makes the Oasis the better overall e-reader.

Verdict

Initially, when the Oasis was released, I judged the Oasis to be priced too high for what it offers. After using the device, I have change my mind. Yes, the bigger screen finally distinguishes the Oasis compared to the Paperwhite and Voyage. However, more than just hardware, the software is what makes the Oasis standout. Most things just work better, compared to other e-readers e.g. smoother highlighting, syncing of personal documents across Amazon devices/apps, consideration of PDF support and the ability to export annotations in different formats etc.

The downside with the Oasis is that it is not innovative enough. I expect more from a high-end Kindle e-reader. For example, stylus support, a larger screen, better contrast and improved battery life. I think the broader issue is not just cost but also Amazon’s conservative strategy in the development of its e-readers.

To conclude, before the Oasis, the Aura One was the benchmark for a larger e-reader. Yet, if you are willing to go one inch smaller, the Oasis is the one to go for.

Monday, 27 November 2017

Kindle Oasis first impressions

Hardware-wise, using the latest generation of the Kindle Oasis feels different to other Kindle e-readers. The larger screen size contributes to this sense of difference, but the biggest issue, in my opinion, is the quirky design. I understand the bump in the first generation served a purpose: to provide a connection point for the battery case. This generation doesn't come with a similar case and I find the bump makes the device uneven and awkward to hold (more so with a case on the device).  The buttons are great, and they make turning pages so much easier with one-handed reading. Hopefully, a full review will come soon. 

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

What to expect with an updated Kindle Paperwhite?

The current Kindle Paperwhite was released spring 2015 and, I believe, the three year mark will see the release of an update (Spring 2018). The updated Paperwhite will probably keep the six inch screen - the seven inch size being restricted to the Oasis - but get the majority of hardware features and near all software features of the Oasis. This means expect a device that comes with waterproofing, Bluetooth support, a lighter and more compact form factor and a slight bump in processor power. Hardware features that will stay the same include the same number of front light LEDs, 4GB storage and a 300 PPI E-Ink Carta screen. If the Voyage is updated, rather than discontinued, then it will probably get an upgrade in the number of LEDs and 8 GB storage, to justify, in comparison to the Paperwhite, its higher pricing. Software will be near identical to the Oasis (Amazon aims to keep firmware features the same, with slight differences related to hardware differences between the different Kindles) and that means Audible integration with the updated Paperwhite.

Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Kindle Oasis and PDF support

KOReader, in comparison to Amazon's native Kindle operating system, offers more features for PDF documents. However, KOReader's software is not stable and the interface is convoluted; the KOReader project is an excellent community driven project but there has been no stable release since November 2015. Thus, to get the right version to work with recent devices, e.g. the Kobo Aura One, it is necessary to download and install a nightly build.

Despite the extra features that KOReader supports, I still prefer Kindle's software. In my opinion, what makes the Kindle's software preferable is its simplicity. The menus are simple and clear - there is one display settings menu that changes orientation, margins and increases contrast. The pinch to zoom, relative to other E-Ink e-readers, works well. Further, highlighting is smooth and dictionary, Wikipedia and translation look-up are all supported. In other words, Amazon put some thought into their PDF support and get the necessary features right. This good PDF support is a significant factor that makes the recently announced Kindle Oasis, with its extra screen estate, an attractive e-reader, despite its relatively high pricing.

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Second generation Kindle Oasis released

Amazon released an updated version of their premium Kindle - the Kindle Oasis. I still think the Oasis does not justify its price and the label 'premium' is more marketing than anything substantial. However, at least with this iteration there is something, on paper, that justifies its existence. The important upgrade is the screen size - the updated 7 inch screen is the first non-six inch e-reader that Amazon has released since the Kindle DX. The size increase, finally, is a welcome addition but the size does not justify the device's pricing; the same point, to a lesser extent, applies to waterproofing, Audible integration, 8GB storage and greater number of LEDs for a more uniform front-light.

I don't expect a refresh for the Kindle Paperwhite or Voyage soon and when a refresh arrives it is possible these device will not get the larger screen. I think the significant demand for a larger screen - something admitted by an Amazon employee here - is being used to differentiate the high-end Oasis (the first generation offered relatively little for its 'premium' label) in comparison to other Kindles and to entice users to purchase the higher-end device. In my opinion, at the moment, the Paperwhite remains the best Kindle to purchase. For a larger e-reader the better option is to go for the 7.8 inch Kobo Aura One or the first generation 7 inch Kobo Aura H20.

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Download Open University short courses

Open University offer a large number of short courses, in the form of Kindle e-books, to download for free. To my knowledge, this is the largest repository of e-books that any university has released; hopefully other institutions will offer online course books and textbooks to download. Open and free digital diffusement is a means to counter imposed artificial scarcity by state funding, publishers and higher education institutions.

Friday, 4 August 2017

Review of the 8th generation Kindle: The best budget six inch e-reader

Amazon’s 8th generation Kindle is priced similar to other entry-level e-readers but what makes it, in my opinion, the best budget e-reader is its refined operating system. The device itself is very capable and there is no skimping on performance. The compromise is in the absence of a front-light and a lower 167 dpi E-Ink Pearl display. Compared to the Kindle Paperwhite there is a clear difference in clarity and sharpness; however, there is an upside with the lower resolution with the entry Kindle's better text scaling (clarified below). The E-Ink Pearl screen itself has good contrast and is superior to, for example, the previous generation of the Icarus XL with its E-Ink Pearl screen. Further, fonts are given more weight, to appear darker, and off-set the lower resolution.

The absence of a front-light, for some users, might be a deal-breaker; if that is the case then the Paperwhite – the overall choice six-inch e-reader – would be the better option. Personally I find the absence of a front-light a non-issue, as zero light emission is the primary reason I choose to read on E-Ink screens. Front-lights, in e-readers, still generate less eye strain compared to back-lit LCD screens and are useful in low-lit environments.

What I prefer in the entry Kindle is the superior text scaling, compared to the higher-resolution Kindle models. It seems the higher dpi of the Paperwhite means more text appears on the screen for each font level. However, the Paperwhite's scaling is problematic in that the difference between each font size level is too high. Thus, the third level is too small but increase the size to four and it is too large; this is a signifiant issue with the limited screen estate of a six inch e-reader. In comparison, the entry Kindle’s size increase is more balanced – level three is a balanced medium setting that works well (see picture below for font scaling comparison between the Kindle and Kindle Paperwhite). As will be clarified below, in regard to software, this issue may be resolved by providing the end-user with greater control over reader settings.

Finally, another positive, is the device’s light-weight compared to the Paperwhite; the device’s light-weight (161 grams) makes it ideal for one-handed reading.


Font size at level three - the entry Kindle is the white e-reader (please click on image to enlarge)
Font size at level four (note the Paperwhite's large increase in size between levels three & four)

Software 

As noted, the hardware is capable and the display is good-enough, considering the lower dpi, but it is the software that makes this the choice entry e-reader. Amazon’s software is near identical across its Kindle devices and so the software used in the entry Kindle offers near identical features that you get with the premium Kindle Oasis. First, some negative issues need to be flagged:
  • There is no way to organise content in collections through folders created on the device’s local storage. Further, for a personal document to be stored in the cloud and synced across devices, it needs to be sent to the user’s designated Kindle email. Greater flexibility and integration between local storage, device collections and cloud synchronisation would simplify the process of organising user content. 
  • There is limited control over text; in comparison, Kobo’s operating system (Nickel) provides superior features. Nickel gives the user greater control over font size, text alignment, margins, line spacing and the further option to side-load fonts. For example, expanding reader settings features might resolve the problem of scaling that comes with a higher dpi screen. One possibility might be to allow the user the option to increase font size by selecting an exact font number (Android e-reading applications, e.g. Moon+ Reader and Bookari, support this feature). Greater control over reading settings and a the absence of a larger Kindle, in my opinion, are the two central issues that Amazon needs to change. 
  • An odd quirk with Amazon’s Kindle software is the extension of selected reading settings from one document to another. Thus, settings selected in one e-book/PDF document is then applied to the next document opened. For example, change screen orientation to landscape, to read a PDF document, and the same orientation is applied in the next e-book opened. It is a small issue but there is no reason why this problem should persist. 
  • There is no page number support; instead, there is location number or percentage of book read. Again, Nickel is better in this area; Kobo allows the user to display page number in reference to the current chapter or entire book.
Below are some positives; these are not exhaustive but, overall, they are examples on why the entry Kindle is the best budget e-reader:
  • Good PDF support – Both Barnes & Noble and Kobo e-readers offer poor PDF support. Amazon’s Kindle software, in contrast, does consider PDF reading and allows the user to highlight text, annotate, look up definitions, write notes and search in a PDF file. The only problem is that there is no Kindle model beyond six inches to optimise the different use-cases of these features (seven inch is the minimum size to read PDF documents comfortably in landscape mode). 
  • Exporting notes and highlights – Amazon allows users to export their annotations and highlights for both Kindle e-books and personal e-books. There is further control on the format of the notes and highlights exported (citation styles include APA, Chicago Style, MLA or none). The exported document produced even categorises the annotations and highlights in reference to e-book location and categorises the output in its relevant chapter and section. 
  • Touch response is excellent; this applies both to the user interacting with menus/settings and highlighting. 
  • Sync support for non-Amazon personal documents – Amazon synchronises personal e-book if they are emailed to the Amazon cloud; this means notes and highlights are available across devices and may be exported via a Fire tablet or Kindle application. 
  • Vocabulary builder – Look-up words and they are then archived for later access; this feature and Word Wise (Word Wise provides simple definitions for potentially difficult words) are useful for learning. 
  • Wikipedia support – If WiFi is turned on the user is able to select a key term and look up it in Wikipedia.
Overall rating: 8/10